Students and Scholars
Against
Corporate Misbehaviour

Year Month

Sacom And Wal-Mart Watch Joint Statement: On Release Of Wal-Mart 2006 Ethical Sourcing

SACOM AND WAL-MART WATCH JOINT STATEMENT

ON RELEASE OF WAL-MART 2006 ETHICAL SOURCING (Aug 2007)

Wal-Mart Watch executive director David Nassar today released the following statement in response to Wal-Mart’s 2006 Ethical Sourcing Report:

“Wal-Mart’s Report on Ethical Sourcing is an attempt to avoid responsibility for the problems the company itself has created.

“In recent years, in factory after factory that supplies goods for Wal-Mart, widespread cases of blatant illegal and unethical labor abuses have been uncovered. Today, we are releasing another report produced by Students and Scholars against Corporate Misbehavior (SACOM) that shows serious labor violations in toy factories in China ranging from [...]

The Wal-Mart Connection

(op-ed submission & feel free to circulate)

Dec 2007

Jenny CHAN
Chief Coordinator
Students & Scholars against Corporate Misbehavior (SACOM)
Tel: (852) 2392 5464 or 2392 5463
Fax: (852) 2392 5463
Skype: wlchanskype
Website: www.sacom.hk
Mailing Address: P.O.Box No. 79583, Mongkok Post Office, Hong Kong

The Wal-Mart Connection

Amidst the holiday shopping season and on the heels of massive toy recalls, products manufactured in China are a hot topic. In recent Congressional hearings, blame was cast on entities ranging from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to manufacturers to the [...]

PRESS STATEMENT on release of Wal-Mart 2006 Ethical Sourcing

SACOM AND WAL-MART WATCH JOINT STATEMENT (Printer friendly version)

Newsletter – Wal-Mart’s Global Labor Violations (Wal-Mart Watch) 2007

The Guardian UK recently published a story documenting the labor violations committed by Bangladeshi factories which supply to Asda and two other British big box retailers. The workers accuse management of paying low wages, demanding excessive overtime, and inflicting physical abuse.

Unfortunately, this is not the first time such accusations have emerged against Asda or Wal-Mart. Over the past few years, the retailer has accumulated a bevy of sweatshops to produce cheap goods at the cost of exploited labor. From Bangladesh to Dominican Republic to the Philippines, Wal-Mart’s record of labor violations is abysmally high.